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Tell us you’re ready to fight for a pesticide-free community! Sign the petition today!

The Map of U.S. Pesticide Reform Policies released by Beyond Pesticides and Organic Consumers Association shows strong demand in the United States for pesticide policies that eliminate hazardous pesticides from public and private spaces.

Is there a pesticide reform policy in your community? Let’s work together to fill the map with local laws that protect health and the environment in favor of safer, organic practices. If you’re interested in getting active in your local government around pesticide reform, sign the petition below.

As the map reveals, this is a fight we can win. Take the passage of Montgomery County’s (Maryland) lawn care Bill 52-14, and a similar law passed in South Portland, Maine, in both cases pushed forward by a grassroots coalition of business leaders, and local and national health and environmental advocates. These broad alliances succeeded in creating the largest communities in the country to stop hazardous pesticide use on public and private property, and advance organic alternative practices and products in its place.

This is an important moment. Chemical industry lobbyists fear that growing recognition of pesticide hazards, and the availability of organic alternatives will inspire other localities to enact similar legislation. There is no question that a transition to ecologically friendly land management is taking hold.

Let's work together to help make the conversion to organic lawn care spread to localities throughout the U.S. If you want to see similar pesticide reform policy enacted in your community, let us know by signing your name below!



Add me to the following list(s):
  • You may share my interest in pesticide reform with Organic Consumers Association.

  • Although you may live in a locality that prohibits local governments from adopting standards more protective than the state, you can work to eliminate the use of pesticides on public property, inspiring action at the state level to roll back preemption and permit a Montgomery-style ordinance.